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Academic Honesty and Citations

Give Credit Where Credit is due...

To act principled and give credit to the creators' of information, students must show where they found the information, ideas and images/videos that they use in projects. Students can do this by writing a bibliography ("sources cited" page) or, for an image, they can include a source credit in its caption.  Below are guidelines for citing sources in primary school (adapted from Avery County Schools, NC, http://www.averyschools.net/Page/2387.)
Watch this video for an overview of why and how to create bibliographies (link to open video in separate window): How To Create Bibliographies.

Creating bibliographic citations

Each bibliographic citation needs to give readers enough information about your source so that they can easily find it again if they wish to. Upper school students need to also make sure that the information is presented in a specific order and format, but in primary school we're more concerned with making sure that the information is present than we are with what it looks like, although format examples are included in our guidelines.

Note that some sources, like online databases, often provide the citation on each page and students can simply copy and paste it into their project.

Students need to include the following information in each citation:

Grades 1 and 2

Book
1. Name of the author.
2. Title of the book.
Example: Shel Silverstein. Where the Sidewalk Ends.

Online Database Article
1. Title of the article.
2. Name of the database.
3. "Online."
Example: Polar Bears. PebbleGo Animals. Online.
Image
1. Name of image creator/photographer, if you can find it.
2. "Title or short description of image."
3. Title of book or name of database where the image was found.
Example: Whitwam, Linda. "Peru." Encyclopaedia Britannica ImageQuest.

Grade 3 

Book
1. Name of the author - last name first.
2. Title of the book.
3. Copyright year.
Example: 
Dematons, Charlotte. Nederland. 2013.
Print Magazine/Newspaper Article
1. Name of the author - last name first.
2.
Title of the article, in quotations (" ").
3. Name of magazine or newspaper.
Example: Johnson, Angela. "Who We Are." Washington Post.
Online Database Article (you can skip using the format below by copying and pasting the citation provided to you)
1. Title of the article, in quotations (" ").
2. Name of the database.
3. Date you visited the website.
4. "Online."
Example: "Rainforest Peoples." Encyclopaedia Britannica Online School Edition. 23 Mar. 2013. Online.

Website Article
1. Name of the author, if you can find it - last name first.
2. Title of the article, in quotations (" ").
3. Name of the website, if you can find it.
4. Date you visited.
5. The http address in brackets ([   ]).
Example:  "Journey into Amazonia." PBS. 21 Feb. 2013. [http://www.pbs.org/journeyintoamazonia/].

Image
Follow guidance for book, online database or website article above, depending on where image was found, and
1.substitute for author: Name of image creator/photographer
, if you can find it.
2. add: Title or short description of image, in quotations (" ").
Example: "Tufted Ducks." Children's Illustrated Encyclopaedia. 1998.

Grades 4 and 5

Book
1. Name of the author - last name first.
2. Title of the book.
3. City of publication:
4. Publisher,
5. Year of publication (usually the same as c
opyright year).
Example:  McCloud, Scott. Making Comics: Storytelling Secrets of Comics, Manga and Graphic Novels. New York: Harper, 2006.

Print Magazine/Newspaper Article
1. Name of the author - last name first.
2.
Title of the article, in quotations (" ").
3. Name of magazine or newspaper.
4. Date of article (day month year).
Example: Johnson, Angela. "Who We Are." Washington Post, 10 Oct. 2015.

Online Database Article (you can skip using the format below by copying and pasting the citation provided to you)
1. Name of the author, if you can find it - last name first.
2. Title of the article, in quotations (" ").

3. Name of the database.
4. URL of article.
5. Date you accessed the article 
(day month year) (use "Accessed").
Example: "Distribution of Coral Reefs." Maps101, www.maps101.com/
index.php?option=com_flexicontent&view=items&cid=533:earth-science-maps&id=2776:d
istribution-of-coral-reefs. Accessed 27 Nov. 2017.


Webpage Article
1. Name of the author, if you can find it - last name first.
2. Title of the page/article, in quotations (" ").
3. Name of the website (usually at the top of the page),
4. Date page/article was written 
(day month year), if you can find it,
5. URL of page/article.
6. Date you accessed the page/article (day month year) (use "Accessed").
Example:  
 Sullivan, John J. "Remarks Following Meeting with Senior Tunisian Government
Officials." U.S. Department of State, 17 Nov. 2017, www.state.gov/s/d/17/
275772.htm. Accessed 21 Nov. 2017.


Image/Photo
1. Name of image creator/photographerif you can find it - last name first.
2. Title or short description of image.
3. Website name (if found on a website), 
4. URL to image.
5. Date you accessed the image (day month year) (use "Accessed").
Example: Legos at the Library. Longview Public Library, www.longviewtexas.gov/
ImageRepository/Document?documentID=2433. Accessed 27 Nov. 2017.


Video Clip
1. Title of the video, in quotations (" ").
2. Name of the host website,
3. Name of person who posted video, if you can find it (preceded by "uploaded by"),
4. Date the video was created (day month year),
5. URL of video.
6. Date you viewed the video (day month year) (preceded by "Accessed").
Example: "En sortant de l'ecole." You Tube, uploaded by Sue Anderson, 4 May 2016,
www.youtube.com/watch?v=yd3R81ta9Vg. Accessed 11 Dec. 2017.

Interview
1. Name of the interviewee, in quotations (" ").
2. "Personal interview."
3. Date of interview.
Example: "Melody Meade." Personal interview. 23 October 2013.
                                         
Last updated Dec. 11, 2017